Nova Scotia                                                                                     

Technocreep: The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy
Date: 
Tue, 10/20/2015
Event Location: 
Delta Barrington, 1875 Barrington Street

Technology is creeping in to all aspects of our lives, from our social interactions to our personal finances and even our physical bodies.  And, yes, there are some creepy people behind those technologies.  They’re not all hackers in dark basements – some work for respected corporations.  Tom Keenan will take us on a tour of the creepy side of technology and give some suggestions about how to protect ourselves and throw the bad guys off our digital scent.

 

Dr. Thomas P. Keenan, FCIPS, I.S.P., ITCP is a popular professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design, and an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of Calgary.

Time:  5:00 pm – registration

            6:00 pm – dinner

            Speaker will start when dessert is served

Cost:   $40.00 for members, $50.00 for non-members

 

   
   
   

As a member of the Government of Canada’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Smart Communities, he was exposed to how the “best and brightest” thinkers were using technology to improve our individual and collective lives.   He continues as an active participant in the activities of the New York City-based Intelligent Community Forum, helping to adjudicate the Smart 

As a member of the Government of Canada’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Smart Communities, he was exposed to how the “best and brightest” thinkers were using technology to improve our individual and collective lives.   He continues as an active participant in the activities of the New York City-based Intelligent Community Forum, helping to adjudicate the Smart Community of the Year competition and teaching a course on that subject.  He writes extensively on technology topics, as the National Technology Correspondent for Business Edge News Magazine, a regular panelist on CTV’s Alberta Primetime, and a frequent guest on many CBC Radio and television programs.

Tom’s lifelong interest in information security resulted in his teaching Canada’s first course in Computer Security (in 1974!) as well as the creation of a CBC Ideas series called Crimes of the Futurewhich predicted future problems such as identity theft and bio crimes such as “organlegging.” That program won the Canadian Science Writers Award in 1984.   Tom does regular technical and non-technical analysis in this field and has collaborated with law enforcement, law firms, individuals and corporations on urgent issues such as identity theft, cyberstalking, information warfare and privacy issues.   He has served as an expert witness in cases involving “computer forensics and the workings of the Internet” and has also spent some fascinating time with Canadian Forces Bravo Company in Afghanistan.

He has served on corporate and non-profit boards including the Information Technology Council of Canada, RDM Corporation, the SEEDS Foundation, the Rotary Club of Calgary, and the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace, and is a Fellow of the CDFAI as well as CIPS.

His new book, Technocreep (www.technocreep.com) explores The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy with dozens of chilling and thought-provoking examples.

Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the special CIPS price of $20

 

Menu:

            Assorted Bread/ Crisps with Whipped Butter

            Chicken Parmesan with Alfredo, Roasted Potato and Vegetables

            Apple Crisp

            Freshly Brewed Coffee/ Tea

            Also a vegetarian option will be provided if needed – please indicate on registration

 

Community of the Year competition and teaching a course on that subject.  He writes extensively on technology topics, as the National Technology Correspondent for Business Edge News Magazine, a regular panelist on CTV’s Alberta Primetime, and a frequent guest on many CBC Radio and television programs.

Tom’s lifelong interest in information security resulted in his teaching Canada’s first course in Computer Security (in 1974!) as well as the creation of a CBC Ideas series called Crimes of the Futurewhich predicted future problems such as identity theft and bio crimes such as “organlegging.” That program won the Canadian Science Writers Award in 1984.   Tom does regular technical and non-technical analysis in this field and has collaborated with law enforcement, law firms, individuals and corporations on urgent issues such as identity theft, cyberstalking, information warfare and privacy issues.   He has served as an expert witness in cases involving “computer forensics and the workings of the Internet” and has also spent some fascinating time with Canadian Forces Bravo Company in Afghanistan.

He has served on corporate and non-profit boards including the Information Technology Council of Canada, RDM Corporation, the SEEDS Foundation, the Rotary Club of Calgary, and the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace, and is a Fellow of the CDFAI as well as CIPS.

His new book, Technocreep (www.technocreep.com) explores The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy with dozens of chilling and thought-provoking examples.

Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the special CIPS price of

As a member of the Government of Canada’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Smart Communities, he was exposed to how the “best and brightest” thinkers were using technology to improve our individual and collective lives.   He continues as an active participant in the activities of the New York City-based Intelligent Community Forum, helping to adjudicate the Smart Community of the Year competition and teaching a course on that subject.  He writes extensively on technology topics, as the National Technology Correspondent for Business Edge News Magazine, a regular panelist on CTV’s Alberta Primetime, and a frequent guest on many CBC Radio and television programs.

Tom’s lifelong interest in information security resulted in his teaching Canada’s first course in Computer Security (in 1974!) as well as the creation of a CBC Ideas series called Crimes of the Futurewhich predicted future problems such as identity theft and bio crimes such as “organlegging.” That program won the Canadian Science Writers Award in 1984.   Tom does regular technical and non-technical analysis in this field and has collaborated with law enforcement, law firms, individuals and corporations on urgent issues such as identity theft, cyberstalking, information warfare and privacy issues.   He has served as an expert witness in cases involving “computer forensics and the workings of the Internet” and has also spent some fascinating time with Canadian Forces Bravo Company in Afghanistan.

He has served on corporate and non-profit boards including the Information Technology Council of Canada, RDM Corporation, the SEEDS Foundation, the Rotary Club of Calgary, and the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace, and is a Fellow of the CDFAI as well as CIPS.

His new book, Technocreep (www.technocreep.com) explores The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy with dozens of chilling and thought-provoking examples.

Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the special CIPS price ofThat program won the Canadian Science Writers Award in 1984.   Tom does regular technical and non-technical analysis in this field and has collaborated with law enforcement, law firms, individuals and corporations on urgent issues such as identity theft, cyberstalking, information warfare and privacy issues.   He has served as an expert witness in cases involving “computer forensics and the workings of the Internet” and has also spent some fascinating time with Canadian Forces Bravo Company in Afghanistan.

He has served on corporate and non-profit boards including the Information Technology Council of Canada, RDM Corporation, the SEEDS Foundation, the Rotary Club of Calgary, and the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace, and is a Fellow of the CDFAI as well as CIPS.

His new book, Technocreep (www.technocreep.com) explores The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy with dozens of chilling and thought-provoking examples.

 

Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the special CIPS price of

That program won the Canadian Science Writers Award in 1984.   Tom does regular technical and non-technical analysis in this field and has collaborated with law enforcement, law firms, individuals and corporations on urgent issues such as identity theft, cyberstalking, information warfare and privacy issues.   He has served as an expert witness in cases involving “computer forensics and the workings of the Internet” and has also spent some fascinating time with Canadian Forces Bravo Company in Afghanistan.

He has served on corporate and non-profit boards including the Information Technology Council of Canada, RDM Corporation, the SEEDS Foundation, the Rotary Club of Calgary, and the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace, and is a Fellow of the CDFAI as well as CIPS.

His new book, Technocreep (www.technocreep.com) explores The Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy with dozens of chilling and thought-provoking examples.

Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the special CIPS price ofPhoto Greg Lane

Greg Lane, FCIPS, I.S.P., ITCP

Registration Deadline: January 24, 2013

NOTE: There's been a last minute change in venue for the event.

We're happy to announce we'll be hosting the event at the Delta Barringtion (Not the Delta Halifax)  Hotel on Barrington St. in Halifax

Prices are remaining the same. $30 for members and students, $40 for non-members

Location: Delta Barrington Hotel, Barrington St., Halifax

Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Registration Link: Register using the Google Form


Speaker’s Bio:


Greg Lane is the Managing Director Ottawa for Cisco. In this capacity he is responsible for the Cisco public sector team which includes the Federal Government, Hospitals and Education in the region. Prior to Cisco Greg was with Avanade as the Director Business Development Public Service for Canada. Prior to joining Avanade Greg worked with Accenture in a Business Development role in the Public Service Group in Ottawa. Greg has also held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Deloitte Consulting, Bell Canada and EDS.

Greg Lane is the Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Information Processing Society (CIPS) and is chair of the CIPS Executive Council. Greg is the past Chair of the International Professional Practice Partnership, (IP3) a global initiative under the UNESCO founded International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) to lead the development of a global IT profession. In these capacities, Greg is a spokesperson on Information Technology (IT) issues related to the profession, on both a National and Global stage.

Greg is a member of a number of boards both Advisory (GTEC,DPI) and Charitable (Outcare and Kemptville District Hospital Foundation). He is a regular GTEC finalist judge for the annual awards of excellence, and is active with both ITAC and DPI. Greg has lectured at the University of Ottawa in the administration faculty on Governance and IT and has also contributed to Lac Carling Review and Canadian Government Executive on the same topic.

Greg holds an MBA from Massey University in New Zealand and both the I.S.P. and ITCP from CIPS. Greg and his wife Elisa are also the proud parents of five children.

Presentation Abstract:


The global IT industry has changed dramatically in the last 20 years and as the industry begins enabling the Internet of Everything, the ways we work and do business will change at lightning speed – again. Greg will present and discuss some of the key trends in both technology and applications in IT. More specifically Greg will show examples of mobile computing and social computing and offer a point of view on the implications for individuals, firms and governments of these trends. Given the pervasive nature of and the growing reliance on technology Greg will discuss the need for professionals and professionalism in ICT.

Key Points:

  • The Internet of Everything – what it is, how it has changed our lives and how it will continue to progress and alter the way we see and interact with the world.
  • The rapid change of technology - where we were 10 years ago in comparison to now, the technology advances in that time and the realm of possibilities that we will be able to see in both the near and distant future.
  • The challenges faced in the IT industry, and the dynamic and pervasive challenges associated with it.